Don’t Stand So Close To Me (In Mediation): How to Conclude a Probate Case In Lockdown

There is a chance, sadly, that another lockdown is coming. You may be reading this during our latest lockdown. Lots of people are concerned that their probate case will have to wait until the world is post-covid. Fortunately, the chances are it will not. Many of my lawyer colleagues deal with non-contentious work. A larger Continue reading

Annie are you OK, are you OK Annie? [at this precise moment in time whilst completing your last will and testament]

The Mental Capacity Act 2005 (“MCA”) introduced a framework for assessing mental capacity, enabling the court to assist persons who lack capacity to manage their affairs by taking decisions or by appointing decision-makers to act on their behalf. MCA is not retrospective and not relevant in considering the validity of wills made prior to 1 April Continue reading

Thy Will Be Done. Maybe…

Those readers who follow legal stories in the press will not have failed to notice a spate of cases concerning end of life decisions. Last month, the Supreme Court ruled that an application may no longer be needed for an order to withdraw life-sustaining treatment for a person with a ‘prolonged disorder of consciousness’. “An Continue reading

Larke v Nugus

A Larke v Nugus request is a request regarding the circumstances of drafting a Will. The starting point is the case of Larke v Nugus (1979) 123 SJ 327. It is a case I sometimes use when advising probate clients. The case held that the professional who drafted the Will should provide information about the drafting and Continue reading

Beddoe Applications

A Beddoe application is a type of application to the court, made by trustees, for directions. The trustees ask for permission from the court to litigate (or continue to litigate) against someone not a party to the proceedings. There is a main application, which is the substantive case itself, and the Beddoe application. Common Beddoe Continue reading